EFnet

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EFnet or Eris-Free network is a major IRC network, with more than 35,000 users. It is the modern-day descendant of the original IRC network.

Statistics

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History

The first split

Initially IRC servers were allowed to link to a single network without any moderation or restriction whatsoever, however this was cause for much abuse. In August of 1990 Jarkko Oikarinen introduced a new Q-Line system, and eris.berkeley.edu was the only server allowing just any other server to link to it. The new Q-Line system allowed servers to disconnect new links as soon as they seen eris.berkeley.edu in the server list, which caused many netsplits over the course of a few days. Over time each server started adding the Q-Line to their configuration, and an entirely separate IRC network was born which they called EFNet, or Eris-Free Network. The remaining servers still attached to Eris were called A-Net which stood for Anarchy Network.

Undernet

Due to problems with abuse and performance a network known as Undernet split from EFNet in October of 1992.

The Great Split and the birth of IRCNet

In July of 1996 there became a disagreement between American and European operators of EFNet, and the European half of the network split forming IRCNet, while the remaining servers continued as EFNet.

CHANFIX

After many DDoS attacks in 2001, EFNet designed and implemented a service known as CHANFIX which gives operator status back in channels which have been taken over or become op-less.

Characteristics

EFnet has large variations in rules and policy between different servers as well as the two major regions (EU and NA). Both have their own policy structure, and each region votes on their own server applications. However, central policies are voted upon by the server admin community which is archived for referencing.

Due to EFnet's nature, it has gained recognition over the years for warez, hackers, and (D)DoS attacks.

EFnet has always been known for its lack of IRC services that other IRC networks support (such as NickServ and ChanServ, although it had a NickServ until April 8, 1994. Instead, the CHANFIX service was introduced to fix "opless" channels.

Most servers on EFnet run ircd-ratbox with one running ircd-hybrid.

EFnet's channel operators are generally free to run their channels however they see fit without the intervention of IRCops. IRCops are primarily there to handle network and server related issues, and rarely get involved with channel-level issues.

External links